Early Detection of Child’s Vision Disorder by Fun Games

A child’s vision ability will help him absorb information and learn about the world around him. At the age of 1 year, the visual acuity of the child has reached 60% of the visual acuity of the adult. Then it increases to 75% – 80% at the age of 1.5 to 2 years. After that, there is a period of perfection learning process to see on both eyes.

Between the age of 1 – 3 years, the coordination between the eyes, hands, and body of the baby was well developed. But if there is an eye disorder, then there can be interference in the ability of the child to learn, concentrate, move the body, and sensory integrity or processes in the nervous system associated with perception and motor movement, and ultimately affect the confidence of the child. A child with an eye disorder will become unstable because what he or she sees is unclear, afraid to start doing something, and moves slowly because of hesitation in taking risks. In fact, later when entering school, he needs to be able to see the distance, and recognize the shape and color. To know the eye disorders in children early on, we can do it through games, as well as train eyesight.

1. Kick the Ball
Prepare a ball, and arrange the object to resemble the goal. Have the kid kick the ball towards the goal to score. The game aims to optimize the development of eye and foot coordination. You can see if the child can see the ball that will be kicked. See also the coordination of the eyeballs, whether his eyes simultaneously in the same direction when observing moving objects. Pay particular attention if the child often misses, or cannot kick the ball in front of him and if his eyeballs do not move compactly.

2. Puzzles
Provide 5 – 10 pieces of puzzle. Random pieces of the puzzle, then give examples how to arrange it hingg be one picture intact. Random it back, then ask the child to arrange it as you have an example. Increase difficulty by providing puzzles with more pieces.
Through this game, you can observe the ability of children to see objects in close range. Pay particular attention if the child should see the puzzle pieces one by one, from close range (less than 30 cm) in order to arrange them. Because close viewing distance is normally around 30 cm.

3. Rolling and Capturing the Ball
Simply provide a medium-sized ball. This time the game is related to optimizing the development of distance perception. You can see if the child can focus on following objects that move closer to him. You can also know the coordination of the eyeball, whether the compact eye is looking in the same direction when observing moving objects.
Sit in front of the child, about 2 meters away. Roll the ball over the child and ask him to catch it. After that, ask him to roll the ball back towards you. Do this several times. Increase the difficulty of playing by splitting the distance between the two of you. Pay attention, if the child has trouble catching the ball approaching him and his eyeballs do not move with compact.

4. Beads Stringing
Prepare large ropes and beads of various shapes. Ask the children to string the beads into the rope according to his creation. Increase difficulty by giving children a smaller variety of beads.
This game aims to see the ability of children to see objects in close proximity. Pay particular attention if the child has to hold the bead close to his eye to see the hole to enter the rope.

5. Connecting Points
Prepare the game paper, which is a picture with connecting dots, or game images find the way. Using crayons, ask the child to connect the dots to form a whole picture or find a way from one point to another.
The purpose of this game is to see the ability of children to see objects at close range. You need to be alert if you find the child squinting at the points. Also if the child often tilts his head to see with one eye.

6. Play the beams
Ask the children to piece together the blocks in their own creation. You should pay attention if the child has to close the beam to his eyes when composing the shape. This means there is something to note with the ability to see objects in close proximity.

7. Three Wheel Bicycle 
Arrange cardboard boxes for lane guides and turn when the child rides his bike. When you are proficient, raise a little one additional wheel to train the balance (visual-spatial).
Beware if the child often hit a cardboard obstacle or hit an object in front of him when he wanted to stop. The game aims to optimize the development of distance perception, see if your child can ride his bike without crashing, and train sensory integrity.

8. Matching Colors
Just set up a set of colorful pairs of cards. Random the card. Then ask the child to match two cards of the same color. The purpose of this game is to know the ability of children to distinguish colors. Pay attention if the child is difficult to distinguish red with green, or yellow with blue. Especially if there is a history of color blindness in the family.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *